SPJS NEWS

Date : 2014-02-19

Head Line : SPJS students observe assembly proceedings on 19th February
News Detail :

Students of the Statesman Print Journalism School obtained the rare experience of observing the proceedings of the West Bengal State Assembly under the supervision of a senior reporter of The Statesman on 19th February. The objective was to expose the students to the world of legislators while they are engaged in their business of debating important issues. The students listened to the Minister for Women`s Development, Mrs Sashi Panja, while she presented to the House the Budget allocations and future plans of her department for self-help groups. Prior to that, the students witnessed a heated debate between ruling and opposition party members, resulting in a chaotic situation which was finally brought under control by the Assembly Speaker. During the recess, the students had an opportunity to visit the Assembly canteen and join the members in having lunch. Subsequently, the Assembly reassembled and the students witnessed a long debate on the State Budget which had been presented a few days earlier. There were also lighter moments when members used unconventional means, such as singing a few lines of a song, to make their points.

Covering the Assembly proceedings is a challenging task for a reporter. It was a rewarding experience for the students who got a taste of what they would have to do in the future. The students finally recorded their impressions in the classroom.

Date : 2014-01-20

Head Line : SPJS students attend media conference at Santiniketan
News Detail :

Students of the Statesman Print Journalism School were invited by the Journalism and Mass Communication Department of Visva Bharati University to take part in an international media conference on “Crony Journalism: Redefining Journalistic Practices`` on 18 and 19 January 2014 at Lipika, Santiniketan. The entire batch left for Santiniketan by the school bus and used the occasion to get a feel of the atmosphere of the internationally renowned university town that owes its heritage to the Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore. The conference was inaugurated by the Vice-Chancellor, Professor Susanta Datta Gupta whom the SPJS students met for an exclusive exchange of ideas. The students were accompanied by the Director, the Administrative Officer and a faculty member.

The opening day of the conference brought a keynote address by the eminent journalist from The Hindu, Shri P. Sainath. Others who spoke included Shri Paranjoy Guha Thakurta, an independent journalist and visiting journalists from the USA and Canada. In her welcome address, the coordinator of the conference, Ms Mausumi Bhattacharyya, head of the journalism and mass communication department, Visva Bharati, expressed her happiness that the Statesman Print Journalism School was taking part in the conference.

The students were exposed to hard-hitting lectures and animated discussions on a controversial theme. The speakers laid emphasis on the fact that crony journalism had its roots in the attempt to increase revenues and to compromise journalistic standards in order to fetch incentives, privileges and rewards. It had also given rise to the evil of paid journalism. In the evening session, Mr Sainath spoke on the subject; Slumdogs vs Millionaires``. The idea was to emphasise the fact that while a handful of Indians had found a place among the richest people in the world, there were large sections that were still living in distress. Mr Sainath particularly referred to the number of farmers` suicides taking place in different parts of the country. He said that in the past 13 years or so, there are official records of more than 84,000 farmers having committed suicide. The lecture was followed by a lively question and answer session which was moderated by the Vice-Chancellor himself.

The SPJS students proceeded to visited several heritage spots on the Visva Bharati campus the following day. They had a glimpse of the classes being held in the open in keeping with the Tagorean tradition of providing education in communion with nature. They had a glimpse of the well known Kala Bhavan which was the venue for the course in the visual arts, the Sangeet Bhavan, the Cheena Bhavan etc. They also visited the houses where Tagore had stayed during his long years in Santiniketan. Finally, the students visited the Rabindra Bhavan museum which was a storehouse of information and the place where the replica of the Nobel medal has been kept under strict security. The students also took time off to visit the local crafts mela where local craftsmen gather to sell their goods at a place called Sonajhuri. A large number of people visit the mela, including thousands from Kolkata, every Saturday when it is held. Altogether, it was an extremely rewarding and learning experience which the students were required to put together into a feature article to be offered for publication in The Statesman.

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Date : 2014-01-20

Head Line : In the Land of Tagore
News Detail :

The students of the Statesman Print Journalism School got the wonderful opportunity of visiting Santiniketan, literally an abode of peace. The occasion was a two-day long international seminar on ‘Crony Journalism: Redefining Journalistic Practices’, organised by Visva Bharati University.
A pristine welcome ceremony was a fitting beginning to the seminar, just what is expected from the university Rabindranath Tagore founded on the principles of peace and harmony. The Vice Chancellor of the university, Prof Sushanta Dattagupta, formally inaugurated the seminar by lighting the lamp and the students of Sangeet Bhavan filled the air with the soaring tunes of Rabindra Sangeet ~ a reflection of the rich culture and sense of tradition inculcated through education.
Crony journalism is a sort of favouritism practiced in journalism, where negative reports about the one favoured is deliberately quashed by journalists for other gains. Together with paid news, which completes this vicious circle, it is the ultimate threat to journalism today. Describing the shrinking moral universe of today’s media, Mr P Sainath, Magsaysay award winning journalist, said, “Indian media is politically free, but imprisoned by profit.” He spoke on the same lines as his fellow journalist-speaker, Mr Paranjoy Guha Thakurta. They both said that an ugly (“detri-media” as Guha Thakurta called it) nexus is being formed between politicians and crony capitalists, and this corporatisation is encroaching upon the media space as well. Mr Guha Thakurta also talked about the emergence of the internet as a sharp contrast to traditional newsprint. However, in spite of many an advantage, the point of concern is the overload of information, much of which is often false.
A different view was given by Dr Sundeep Muppidi from the University of Hartford, Connecticut, in regard to cronyism. Through a presentation on market economy as being the root cause of crony capitalism, he suggested that crony journalism is nothing more than a consequence of this economic phenomenon. While most of the days were spent on more such discussions on the fallibilities of media in India and possible ways of surpassing this dark phase, the spare time was utilised marvelling at the splendour Santiniketan had to offer. Tagore’s land is changing fast. The vast fields that nearly touched the horizon and reddish-brown roads, magnificent in their unkempt beauty, that always seemed to go nowhere are now being shadowed over by new constructions coming up.
Still all is not lost. As we strolled through the Visva Bharati University, we found enthusiastic children of Patha Bhavan learning under the shades of green ~ Tagore’s idea of nurturing the bond with nature. The buildings of Kala Bhavan, Sangeet Bhavan and Vidya Bhavan are just as scintillating ~ constructed in accordance to their purpose, the subject of study. Rabindra Bhavan, or what is known as the research centre and Tagore Museum, exhibits various articles from the Tagore household as well as rare letters and pictures/paintings. It also houses personal articles the poet used (including his beloved car, a 1933 black Humber) and various editions of his works.
We also roamed around Tagore’s houses in the Uttarayan complex, consisting five very different buildings ~ Udayan, Konark, Shyamali, Udichi and Punashcha. The scattered leaves and dry flowers under the trees manifested, as if more than just the presence of winter. The absolute quiet was pleasantly broken by chirping birds and occasional lines of Tagore’s poems and songs.
Our final stop was Sonajhuri ~ a perfect example of rural Santiniketan at its best. The soft tunes of a Baul’s Iktara, another prominent feature associated with Santiniketan, greeted us on the way. Exquisite pieces of handicraft ~ colourful necklaces and ear-rings made of dried seeds, dress material and other apparels of clothing and bags, adorned with kantha stitch and batik print, various artefacts made of Dokra, and beautiful leather goods with the quintessentially ‘santiniketani’ designs were displayed for sale. The temptation was too hard to resist.
We had spent only a weekend at Santiniketan; yet, the time was enough to wash away all the urban-ness off of us. The dusty roads, the soft soothing orange sun, the tunes in the air and the general sense of serenity had completely transformed our moods. We were so immersed in the accommodating culture around, no one really felt shock or even surprise, when the Czech lady standing beside us at the tea-stall uttered in lucid Bengali, “Amake ek cup chaa deben…”

Date : 2014-01-07

Visit to German Consulate
News Detail :

For the second year in a row, students of the Statesman Print Journalism School were invited by the Consul-General of the Federal Republic of Germany, Mr Rainer Schmiedchen, to visit the Consulate in Alipore, Kolkata, to understand the functioning of the mission. They made a round of the different departments, including the Visa Section, to get acquainted with the staff and the working methods. Later, they had an exclusive interaction with the Consul-General on issues related to Indo-German relations and the issues confronting Germany today. He said that the power issue is the most important in Germany now and it is set to be resolved by 2020. He also screened a film for the benefit of the SPJS students to show that Germany is the land of ideas for people from different parts of the world. It was a learning experience for the students which was followed up with a report that was published the following day in The Statesman.

Date : 2013-12-15

Field trip to Sunderbans
News Detail :

Students of the Statesman Print Journalism School made a field trip to the Sunderbans on 13 December 2013 to gain first-hand experience of the environment for the purpose of writing a feature. They were accompanied by Professor Ashis Ghosh, Director of the Centre for Environment and Development, who takes classes on environmental issues at the SPJS.
The trip started at nine in the morning for a drive in the SPJS bus to Dhamakhali where the students spent the night in a government lodge run by an NGO. From Dhamakhali, the students were taken by boat to the island of Sandeshkhali to acquaint themselves with the working of the NGO. It was quite an adventure travelling by the boats which were dangerously slim, like canoes. When the students landed on the other bank, it was like any other Bengal countryside, nothing like those lush and exotic islands that one finds in movies. Here were the headquarters of the NGO. Its work included interventions in cases of domestic violence, a child helpline for tackling child trafficking, a seed bank collecting rare rice seeds. People living in these areas have to remain content with their limited means, facing great odds likes the Aila, unfed tigers, local goons or some targeting underage girls for trafficking. The NGO has been trying to improve living conditions and ensure safety of the residents.
The students were taken on a trip down the river Matla which was quite stunning in its beauty. As darkness fell on the area, the river was lit up by the moon. It was a very rewarding experience after which the students returned to Kolkata. Each of them produced a feature article as part of a project that the SPJS organises every year.

Date : 2013-11-24

Reporting and Writing workshop – Ms Kalyani Shankar
News Detail :

Ms Kalyani Shankar, a veteran journalist who participated in the Editors` Conclave on ``Elections and the Media`` from 19 to 21 November 2013 at the Vedic Village, stayed back in Kolkata to conduct a workshop on Reporting and Writing at the Statesman Print Journalism School on 22 and 23 November 2013. She discussed some important developments that she had witnessed and written about during her long experience both in India and abroad. She gave the students an idea of some of the skills they needed while interacting with dignitaries in the process of securing information for the news columns. Delhi is a hive of political activity and she drew on some of her experiences of working in the capital to teach the students the art of good reporting and writing in the capital. She also gave the students some reporting exercises which were very useful.

Date : 2013-11-22

Editors` Conclave – Elections and the Media
News Detail :

As in previous years, CRI Irani Foundation organised an Editors` Conclave on the theme ``Elections and the Media`` at the Vedic Village, Kolkata, from 19 to 21 November 2013. The conclave was important in the context of the mini-general election that was going to be held in five states prior to the general election in 2014. The conclave revolved largely around the Supreme Court judgment that compelled the Election Commission to undertake major reforms like NOTA (none of the above), referring to the provision by which voters could press a button to discard all the candidates nominated by the political parties. Another important difference this time was the introduction of the paper trail that was meant to ensure that voting machines were not tampered with. But all this was also seen in the context of the media`s role while covering elections – whether it was doing enough to help clean the election process.
The conclave was attended by a number of important personalities from around the country and abroad. At the inaugural session, the keynote speakers were Mr Sayan Chatterjee, IAS (retd.), former Secretary to the Government of India and Deputy Election Commissioner. In his address, he gave an account of his experiences in conducting elections even in troubled states like Jammu and Kashmir. On the other hand, Dr. Peter Schiwy, former head of German Radio, provided a German perspective on the conduct of elections. The different sessions of the conclave included Election reforms and judicial intervention, Media – responsible or crooked?, Best practices and the way forward. The panelists included Mr Ravindra Kumar, Editor, The Statesman, who welcomed the guests in the inaugural session, Mr Sam Rajappa, Mr Siddharth Bhatia, Ms Kalyani Shankar, Mr Manash Ghosh, Mr Ajoy Bose, Mr NK Singh (Secretary, Broadcast Editors Association), Mr Tathagata Satpathy, Dr Usha Ramanathan, Mr Shameek Sen and Mr NK Singh (Resident Editor, Hindustan Times, Bhopal) and Mr Pradip Phanjoubam. All of them are senior journalists and their remarks generated a lively debate.
Students of The Statesman Print Journalism School took an active part in the discussions along with students from the National University of Juridical Sciences.
A highlight of this year`s conclave was the presence of Mr Rainer Schmiedchen, Consul-General of the Federal Republic of Germany. He delivered a Dinner Speech on the opening night in which he offered an account of the situation in Germany in the context of relations with India. His speech also generated an interesting discussion. The proceedings of the conclave will be compiled in a book to be prepared by the faculty of the SPJS

Date : 2013-11-22

Reporting and writing workshop
News Detail :

Mr Sidharth Bhatia, veteran journalist and writer who participated in the Editors` Conclave on Elections and the Media`` from 19 to 21 November 2013 at the Vedic Village stayed back in Kolkata to conduct a two-day reporting and writing workshop at the Statesman Print Journalism School. He gave the students a thorough knowledge of feature writing for newspapers with emphasis on current events. This included the art of interviewing personalities for newspapers after researching the subject that the personality was connected with. Writing interviews in an attractive manner is an important contribution to the Features sections of newspapers. He taught the students the skills of asking the right questions and extracting the best answers from the point of view of the reader. Mr Bhatia also taught the students to write accurately and clearly and in a compact manner keeping in mind the requirements of the newspaper. The first day included a practical exercise which Mr Bhatia checked the following day, giving the students individual tips on how they could develop into professional journalists.

Date : 2013-11-19

Reporting and editing workshop by Mr Sam Rajappa
News Detail :

Mr Sam Rajappa, a veteran journalist and former Director, Statesman Print Journalism School, conducted a reporting and editing workshop at the Statesman Print Journalism School from 14 to 18 November 2013. The workshop was held prior to the Editors` Conclave on ``Elections and the Media`` at the Vedic Village from 19 to 21 November 2013. The students were given a thorough understanding of the topics on which they were expected to participate at the conclave. To begin with, Mr Rajappa taught them the basics of reporting. This include the methods they ought to go out in search of stories, utilising sources to extract the best possible material and to write the report in a simple and lucid style. Drawing on his vast experience, Mr Rajappa gave the student an inside view of a reporter`s job while covering stories that break or while investigating important developments.One of the practical exercises that Mr Rajappa conducted was a day-long tour of the Komagata Maru memorial built in memory of a freedom fighter at Budge Budge in the southern suburbs of Kolkata. The students discovered both the historical significance of the monument as well as its contemporary relevance and maintenance arrangements. They followed up the visit with a report.
On other days, the students were engaged in editing practices with special reference to the manner in which reports could be brushed up with the elimination of unnecessary detail and common errors. They were also taught the art of writing good headlines and picture captions. During the four days that the workshop was held, the students received useful knowledge of the fundamentals of print journalism that would benefit them after their stint at the SPJS

Date : 2013-09-27

SPJS students visit excavation site
News Detail :

The Chandraketugarh excavation site in the northen suburbs of Kolkata has been in the news for more than half a century since the discovery of priceless artefacts after excavation conducted by the Ashutosh Museum of Calcutta University in 1956-57. Since then there have been reports of these invaluable objects like clay pipes, coins, ivory bangles and bronze and terracotta images which provide evidence of a civilisation more than 2,500 years ago from the Maurya to the Pala ages being sold off to organisations abroad. Steps have been taken to prevent these activities and a number of reports have appeared in newpapers in this context. It was thus an appropriate subject for a study tour by students of the Statesman Print Journalism School. A similar tour had been conducted last year with the support of the West Bengal Heritage Commission. The students accompanied by the Director and Administrative Officer were again taken on a tour of the Chadraketugarh site by Dr Basudeb Malik, Officer on Special Duty, West Bengal Heritage Commission, on Friday, 27 September 2013.
The SPJS students first encountered the site where excavation had been done in 1956-57 by a team sent by Calcutta University. It has now been taken over as a protected zone by the Archaeological Survey of India. The students visited another site that is surrounded by a wall and is also protected since it is believed that many more artefacts may be existing under the soil. It was an enriching and enlightening experience for the students which they recorded as individual project reports. One of the faculty members is in the process of putting together these individual project reports into a consolidated article to be offered for publication in a newspaper. A two-hour drive took the students to the excavation site which is called Khanamihirer Dhipi which had yielded the remains of palaces and temples. They also visited the private museum run by Dilip Mohite at Chandraketugarh. He has been collecting the priceless objects for the last 40 years. The students had an extensive session with with. He confirmed that he is willing to hand over his entire collection to a museum set up by the government at Chadraketugarh. He was pleased to learn that the State Heritage Commission had acquired a plot of land in the area and promised to part with his entire collection.
All these facts and experiences have been put on record by the students who found the field trip extremely rewarding.

Date : 2013-09-26

SPJS students assess Oscar aspirant
News Detail :

The Lunchbox, a film written and directed by Ritesh Batra, has been in the news as a favourite in India`s race for an Oscar in the foreign film category. However, it was edged out of the race by a Gujarati film, The Good Road, resulting in a huge controversy in the media since The Lunchbox had promoters from all over the world and had been shown at the last Cannes film festival. It had also received very good notices in the media. Thus it was considered appropriate to take students of the Statesman Print Journalism School to a screening of the film in Kolkata on 26 September 2013. It was felt that the students could be given an opportunity to form their own impression of the film and write separate reviews which is part of the training.
The Lunchbox is a story of human nature and relationship in the loneliness of life in a bustling metropolis. What is significant about this movie is its unique style of merging a documentary and a commercial feature film. The story is essentially connected to the dabbawallahs of Mumbai, an intricate yet almost perfect system of lunch-delivery to various offices in the city. Yet, the plot is that of human relations. The Lunchbox has been said to be an exemplary film in the domain of Indian cinema, both as a script and in terms of cinematography. After a favourable reception internationally for its ``crossover appeal``, the film was a favourite choice as India`s selection for the Academy Awards this year, until it controversially lost to The Good Road.
For the students whose curriculum consists of writing reviews and critical analyses, this film was considered a good exercise. They were taught to appreciate the nuances of film-making ~ to assess an intelligent script, performances by the actors, cinematography including specific shots, various techniques employed and so on. Following the movie, the students wrote a review in class.

Date : 2013-09-09

SPJS students attend conference at Chandigarh
News Detail :

Students of the Statesman Print Journalism School were invited by the PHD Chamber to take part n a national conference on “Youth and inclusive growth`` at Chandigarh on 8 and 9 September 2014. The conference was held in association with the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung of New Delhi. This was the first time that SPJS students joined the conference which was part of KAS`s 30th Annual Joint Staff Development Programme. The students took an active part in the discussions along with 200 delegates from different parts of the country. The conference threw up important issues such as the connection between curricula and entrepreneurial opportunities and application-based skills. Among those who took part in the conference were Mr Ranjan Choudhury, Principal of the National Skill Development Corporation; Mrs Sudha Sharma, Director-General (Investigation), Income Tax, Chandigarh; and Mr Parminder Singh Dhindsa, Finance Minister, Punjab. The consensus was that youth power was a double-edged weapon. If harnessed properly, it could yield enormous results but, in case of disharmony in development programmes between rural and urban sectors, there is every possibility of the power becoming destructive. The question-and-answer sessions resulted in a lively exchange. The SPJS students were given the opportunity of making a study tour of the city of Chandigarh. The students` experience in Chandigarh was recorded in a series of articles in The Statesman.

Date : 0000-00-00

The Statesman Awards for Rural Reporting 2014
News Detail :

The Statesman Awards for Rural Reporting 2014 and the Cushrow Irani Prize for Environmental Reporting were given away at Kala Mandir on September 16.SPJS students participated in the programme and for the first time recited the citations for the award winners.The award winners were,Mr Saji Mulanthuruthy for his story on the plight of tribals in Kerala-Tamil Nadu border,Mr Ashraff Vattapara for his report on the flesh trade on the border areas of Kerala and Tamil Nadu and Mr Ketan Trivedi for his report on the Desar village.The environmental reporting award was given to Mr Bharat Dogra.
The award giving ceremony was followed by a panel discussion on the topic`for India`s sake the Congress must survive`.The panelists were distinguished personalities-Prof Hari Vasudevan,Mr MG Devashayam,Mr Krishnan Srinavasan,Ms Kalyani Shankar,Prof Omprakash Mishra and Mr Sidharth Bhatia.The SPJS students were in the audience to absorb the points raised which they would later discuss in class.The discussion was fruitful especially for the students as it allowed them the opportunity to study various opinions regarding the present political scenario.

Date : 0000-00-00

SPJS STUDENTS ATTEND WORKSHOP ON ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM
News Detail :

SPJS students attended the workshop titled `` IN ADVOCACY OF ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM IN INDIA``, organized by Millenium Institute of Energy & Environment Managementand in association with the Council for Scientific & Cultural Research, Government of India on 13 September, 2014 ( Saturday) at Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Jadavpur. Environmentalists, social commentators and legal experts gave presentations on emerging environmental issues and the need to take steps to minimize environmental degradation. Dignitaries who enlightened the audience included Mr. Manash Ghosh, Editor, Dainik Statesman; Mr. Swapan Mullick, Director, SPJS; Mr. Samar Bagchi, former Director, BITM; Dr. Asis Kr. Ghosh, Dr. Jayanta Kumar Biswas, Prof. Shameek Sen, Dr. Abhijit Mitra and Dr. Dipankar Chakraborty. Environmental Journalism is part the SPJS curriculum. The speakers went into the history of environmental reporting and the efforts being made recently to raise the level of awareness on environmental issues. The students benefited from the experience and reported on the event as part of their project.

Why SPJS ?

MISSION

English-language newspapers in India today face a shortage of qualified, competent journalists. Many media schools have shifted focus to television, and produce graduates who are confused about the choice of medium. The problem is compounded in West Bengal, where many of the youngsters now ready to join the profession entered school at a time when English was taught Class 5 onwards...
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OBJECTIVES

The SPJS has been set up as a journalism school that :
(a) Trains youngsters to be competent, well-informed, liberal-minded journalists with an abiding faith in India’s democratic institutions and the rule of law, and an abhorrence for tyranny, injustice and corruption;
(b) Aims for the highest standards of professional competence, so that its graduates emerge as ethical, fair and well-rounded journalists;
Read More

Faculty

The SPJS is headed by Mr Swapan Mullick, a distinguished senior journalist who has been associated with The Statesman (as sub-editor, Assistant Editor and Senior Editor) for almost his entire professional life. He was also Director of the Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute from 2006 to 2009.
Other members of the faculty include practising senior journalists from within The Statesman and outside. In addition, the SPJS arranges interactions between students and distinguished persons of various fields from India and overseas.
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Placements

The SPJS offers a unique placement-cum-reward facility to the best of its students. At least five students from each batch are offered positions on regular scales at The Statesman. In addition, the first three students will be refunded 1/3 rd of the tuition fee paid by them upon completion of each year of service. In effect, those three students can expect a full fee refund from The Statesman by the time they have worked for three years. Additionally, but subject to vacancies,...
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What Alumni Say

Why SPJS ?

ABOUT US

The Statesman Print Journalism School was set up in 2008 by the C R Irani Foundation, a not-for-profit body set up in memory of Cushrow Russi Irani, who was Editor-in-Chief of The Statesman from 1991 until his death in July 2005. The late Cushrow Irani was a distinguished newspaperman, who won the Commonwealth Astor Prize and the Freedom House Medal for his role in safeguarding freedom of the Press in India...
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MISSION

English-language newspapers in India today face a shortage of qualified, competent journalists. Many media schools have shifted focus to television, and produce graduates who are confused about the choice of medium. The problem is compounded in West Bengal, where many of the youngsters now ready to join the profession entered school at a time when English was taught Class 5 onwards...
Read More

OBJECTIVES

The SPJS has been set up as a journalism school that :
(a) Trains youngsters to be competent, well-informed, liberal-minded journalists with an abiding faith in India’s democratic institutions and the rule of law, and an abhorrence for tyranny, injustice and corruption;
(b) Aims for the highest standards of professional competence, so that its graduates emerge as ethical, fair and well-rounded journalists;
Read More

Faculty

The SPJS is headed by Mr Swapan Mullick, a distinguished senior journalist who has been associated with The Statesman (as sub-editor, Assistant Editor and Senior Editor) for almost his entire professional life. He was also Director of the Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute from 2006 to 2009.
Other members of the faculty include practising senior journalists from within The Statesman and outside. In addition, the SPJS arranges interactions between students and distinguished persons of various fields from India and overseas.
Read More

Placements

The SPJS offers a unique placement-cum-reward facility to the best of its students. At least five students from each batch are offered positions on regular scales at The Statesman. In addition, the first three students will be refunded 1/3 rd of the tuition fee paid by them upon completion of each year of service. In effect, those three students can expect a full fee refund from The Statesman by the time they have worked for three years. Additionally, but subject to vacancies,...
Read More

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