img
img
img
img
img
img
img

    About Us

  • The Statesman Print Journalism School was set up in 2008 by the C R Irani Foundation, a not-for-profit body set up in memory of Cushrow Russi Irani, who was Editor-in-Chief of The Statesman from 1991 until his death in July 2005. The late Cushrow Irani was a distinguished newspaperman, who won the Commonwealth Astor Prize and the Freedom House Medal for his role in safeguarding freedom of the Press in India. He was twice chairman of the International Press Institute, served on the board of Article XIX with distinction, headed several important professional bodies including the Indian Newspaper Society, the Audit Bureau of Circulations and Press Trust of India, and was a member of the National Commission to Review the Constitution.

    The SPJS has been set up with support from Germany's Konrad Adenauer Stiftung.

  • Mission

  • English-language newspapers in India today face a shortage of qualified, competent journalists. Many media schools have shifted focus to television, and produce graduates who are confused about the choice of medium. The problem is compounded in West Bengal, where many of the youngsters now ready to join the profession entered school at a time when English was taught Class 5 onwards. The Statesman Print Journalism School aims to produce high-quality, English-language journalists.

  • Objectives

  • The SPJS has been set up as a journalism school that :

    (a) Trains youngsters to be competent, well-informed, liberal-minded journalists with an abiding faith in India’s democratic institutions and the rule of law, and an abhorrence for tyranny, injustice and corruption;

    (b) Aims for the highest standards of professional competence, so that its graduates emerge as ethical, fair and well-rounded journalists;

    (c) Prepares its students for the realities of the world and the environment they must function in, training them to recognise both the good and the bad that they will see around them, and above all,

    (d) Creates journalists who will be exceptional citizens, and who will strive to make their world a better place.

  • Course & Fees

  • COURSE OFFERED : PG DIPLOMA IN ENGLISH PRINT JOURNALISH

    CURRICULUM:

    The entire focus of SPJS is on print journalism. Towards this end, the syllabus will cover the following:
    a) Reporting, with special emphasis on news reporting, business reporting, interview techniques and sports reporting;
    b) Editing, Headline and Caption Writing;
    c) Feature Writing;
    d) Newspaper design and Page Make-up;
    e) Production Methods;
    f) Law of the Press in India;
    g) News photography;
    h) Specialised writing on environment and legal issues;
    i) Understanding India ~ its institutions, its political and legal framework, its security environment and its neighbours, and
    j) Understanding the world ~ to sensitise students to international institutions and multi-lateral frameworks, with emphasis on three regions of special interest-Asia, Europe and the European Community and the United States.
    Read More

Director’s Note

At the end of each year, we have the satisfaction of having equipped another batch of aspiring journalists with the mindset and skills to step into a challenging career. This year the excitement acquired a new dimension when their Internship in The Statesman coincided with the assembly election. We found students going out on poll-related assignments and briefing us on the latest developments. Others working on the desk kept narrating the thrills of producing pages with election stories. All this was an indication that, like the seven earlier batches, they were on the right track.

The experience of field trips was mixed with classroom sessions that were rigorous but stimulating. Particularly rewarding was a visit by Dr Michael Andreas Luders, veteran journalist and author from Germany. He delivered the keynote address at the Editors’ Conclave at the Vedic Village and stayed on in Kolkata to spend two days with the SPJS students. It was as useful as the experience in Goa where the students met professionals from across the country at the seminar on skill development projects in India and Germany. Another veteran journalist, Mr Siddharth Bhatia, introduced them to the growing world of on-line journalism. A weeklong workshop on Reporting that taught them the basics and took them on outdoor assignments and feature and sports writing classes further helped to expand their horizons and, at the same time, inculcate the virtues of dedication, discipline and freedom of expression that will hopefully remain with them. These are unique achievements that we will continue to cherish.

Guests Speak


Michael Lueders ,
Veteran German Journalist
The Statesman Print Journalism School in Calcutta is not only an institution, an address, a title. It is more that that, letters filled with life, a way of life even. Coming from Berlin, Germany, I found Calcutta to be - well, certainly different from what I am normally used to. Most Europeans are fascinated by an architecture that combines the flavor of Victorian times and present day Indian assertiveness - be the traffic and general chaos around The Statesman building as it may be. Once you enter the revolving door that has been revolving since the roaring 20ies, you feel that you entered a very special place. Even more so when using the rumbling elevator that was already in operation when Mahatma Gandhi campaigned in South Africa …

Living history continues when thumbing through newspaper editions of The Statesman years and decades old. What a journalistic institution! After entering the newsroom itself, there is little left that reminds of yesterday. Instead, there is a kind and dedicated staff living up to the challenges of reporting every day anew, and, walking a little further down the hallway, there it comes: India's most remarkable, superior, supreme journalism school that I would have yearned to visit as a student of journalism in Germany. My first thought: Wow! What great people. Friendly, open-minded, multi-talented, with a good sense of humor and full of forgiveness … After all, as a short-term visitor I had asked the students whether they would be willing to write short stories on freely chosen subjects dealing with Calcutta. Prime-journalism, so to speak. I felt like a bad boss who squeezes the last energies out of the workers … But, the students took up the challenge, although it spoiled their weekend. And the result was so stunningly good that publishing houses in India and beyond have all reason to compete for these young talents …. Reading the results with the students gave me a crash course about life and death in Calcutta, the many faces and facettes of one of India's most fascinating cities. Again and again, I was stunned by the motivation and devotion of all students, who enjoy a high quality education by experienced journalists and prolific writers who do not keep their professional secrets to themselves …

The Statesman Print Journalism School is not just a place to learn and to be. Dealing with this institution easily turns into a love affair. You love it, you do not want to leave it. And once you do, you know you are part of a wider family that works to make this world a better place.



Tasneem Ahmar ,
Director of Uks Research Centre, Pakistan
It was indeed a great opportunity to share some thoughts with the students and faculty of The Statesman Print Journalism School. Though there was an attentive audience, I could feel that gender perhaps is not a top priority for many journalists. There would have been more interest if the discussion was on issues of violent extremism, countering terrorism, relationship between the the two neighbours etc, etc. And believe me, I face the same challenge here in my country, how to raise the level of awareness and interest of working journalists- both desk and field- on issues of gender equality, changing mindsets and behaviour and make women equal partners in national development. But I did enjoy the session and hopefully would be there again to take the discussion further

Course Details

Post-graduate Diploma in English Print Journalism
Foto
   
READ MORE

A STUDENT’S DAY

Typically, a student`s day will be divided between classroom instruction and field work, including assignments, exposure to the newsroom environment and production techniques.For an hour each day, students will join one of The Statesman`s senior editors to critique the morning`s papers,...

Foto
   
READ MORE

FEE STRUCTURE

Tuition : Rs 80,000
Course materials, periodicals,
Library, field trips : Rs 17,000
The Statesman Style Book : Rs 1,000
Internet charges : Rs 1,000
Convocation fee : Rs 1,000
Total : Rs 100,000 + applicable service tax
Security Deposit : Rs 10,000

Foto
   
READ MORE

PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Upon acceptance of offer : Rs 45,000
On joining the course : Rs 45,000 (including security deposit of Rs. 10,000)
By 31 October : Rs 20,000 ...

Foto
   
READ MORE

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

Applicants must at least be graduates (in any discipline), not more than 25 years old, and possess sound English language skills. Those appearing for final examinations can also apply.

Admission, Faculty, Placements...



Foto

ADMISSION PROCEDURE

OUR NEWSROOM IS YOUR CLASSROOM
Applications are invited for the eighth batch of students for the Post-Graduate Diploma course in English Print Journalism at The Statesman Print Journalism School. The prospectus/application form may be downloaded from the Download section on this site. Completed application forms should be submitted along with a Demand Draft for Rs 1,500 payable to the C R Irani Foundation at Kolkata. The deadline for receiving completed applications is 11 June 2016. The course will begin in August 2016 and end in May 2017.

Foto

FACULTY

The SPJS is headed by Mr Swapan Mullick, a distinguished senior journalist who has been associated with The Statesman (as sub-editor, Assistant Editor and Senior Editor) for almost his entire professional life. He was also Director of the Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute from 2006 to 2009.

Other members of the faculty include practising senior journalists from within The Statesman and outside. In addition, the SPJS arranges interactions between students and distinguished...

Foto

PLACEMENT

The SPJS offers a unique placement-cum-reward facility to the best of its students. At least five students from each batch are offered positions on regular scales at The Statesman. In addition, the first three students will be refunded 1/3 rd of the tuition fee paid by them upon completion of each year of service. In effect, those three students can expect a full fee refund from The Statesman by the time they have worked for three years. Additionally, but subject to vacancies, other graduating students will be considered for positions in The Statesman. Specialised Placement Assistance will be...

Some of our memorable moments





What Alumni Say

Why SPJS ?

ABOUT US

The Statesman Print Journalism School was set up in 2008 by the C R Irani Foundation, a not-for-profit body set up in memory of Cushrow Russi Irani, who was Editor-in-Chief of The Statesman from 1991 until his death in July 2005. The late Cushrow Irani was a distinguished newspaperman, who won the Commonwealth Astor Prize and the Freedom House Medal for his role in safeguarding freedom of the Press in India...
Read More

MISSION

English-language newspapers in India today face a shortage of qualified, competent journalists. Many media schools have shifted focus to television, and produce graduates who are confused about the choice of medium. The problem is compounded in West Bengal, where many of the youngsters now ready to join the profession entered school at a time when English was taught Class 5 onwards...
Read More

OBJECTIVES

The SPJS has been set up as a journalism school that :
(a) Trains youngsters to be competent, well-informed, liberal-minded journalists with an abiding faith in India’s democratic institutions and the rule of law, and an abhorrence for tyranny, injustice and corruption;
(b) Aims for the highest standards of professional competence, so that its graduates emerge as ethical, fair and well-rounded journalists;
Read More

Faculty

The SPJS is headed by Mr Swapan Mullick, a distinguished senior journalist who has been associated with The Statesman (as sub-editor, Assistant Editor and Senior Editor) for almost his entire professional life. He was also Director of the Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute from 2006 to 2009.
Other members of the faculty include practising senior journalists from within The Statesman and outside. In addition, the SPJS arranges interactions between students and distinguished persons of various fields from India and overseas.
Read More

Placements

The SPJS offers a unique placement-cum-reward facility to the best of its students. At least five students from each batch are offered positions on regular scales at The Statesman. In addition, the first three students will be refunded 1/3 rd of the tuition fee paid by them upon completion of each year of service. In effect, those three students can expect a full fee refund from The Statesman by the time they have worked for three years. Additionally, but subject to vacancies,...
Read More

Global Partners

Partners  Partners

To Download Application Form Click The Link Below...

Download Application Form